Podcast 21: Bringing Home the Bacon


 
What happens when you merge the worlds of doctor and personal trainer?
 
What do you find at the crossroads of medicine, theory and practice?
 

The Relentless Roger and the Caveman Doctor (RRCD) Podcast:  Simplifying complex issues for healthy living

 

Click here for itunes!


Click here for the mp3


 
The podcast exists to take our daily efforts in the physical world and distill usable information for you, the listener.
 

In Episode #21 Roger and Dr. Champ Discuss:

26 Comments

  1. jake3_14

    Dr. Champ,

    When you finish interviewing, will you release your paleo presentation into the public domain (including a pre-emptive discussion of the flaws of the China Study)? It would be a terrific asset to have another lay-friendly presentation available. I could, however, understand, if you wanted to put the material into your upcoming book instead.

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Jake,

      You read my mind. I literally just got done talking with someone 2 hours ago about posting one of my presentations. I will do this, though it may take me a couple months since interviews and traveling are eating up every spare minute.

      Thanks!

      Reply
  2. Mike

    Will you be brandishing the club you’ve got in the cartoon on the cover of the book, Caveman Doctor? Or maybe you could be photographed hitting Roger in the stomach with a wiffle bat.

    On a serious note, some anthropological material would be interesting if you wanted to include that. It would also be good to see some of the original photographs of tribal people that you said you had in one episode.

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Thanks Mike. I have a lot of material on this and I am trying to figure out how to incorporate.

      I like the club ideas, but I’ll have to run it by Roger…

      Reply
      1. Mike

        Great.

        I thought I’d eat raw egg yolks as part of my breakfast this morning. As someone who also sometimes does this, you’ll sympathize with me … because trying to separate them, I dropped one down the sink. Annoying. The hazards of being an urban caveman.

        Reply
        1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

          Mike, I hear you. I have lost a many eggs yolks this way…

          Reply
  3. Katalin

    Interesting info about nitrates!
    Back to one of your previous podcasts, I haven’t watched telly for over 1.5 years, as I decided not to have a licence when I moved house. Now I make my own organic beauty products, learning to sew custom garments, cook everything from scratch, make my own ferments, walk my dog an hour a day, work out, listen to podcasts, read, even had a go at growing organic vegetables. Next stop is getting my own chickens! :-) On top of this, I do have a busy job, just spend my free time productively.
    Always looking forward to your podcasts!

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Katalin,
      That’s amazing! I envy you and hope to have chickens one day.

      Take care,
      Colin

      Reply
  4. kem

    BTW Mark Sisson competed in both marathon and triathalon. Chris Kressser, as wise as he is for is his years, is not a “Dr”.

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Thanks Kem, I didn’t think he was but Roger called him one so I went with it. What can I say, I’m a follower.

      -CC

      Reply
  5. reader

    Hi Dr Champ,

    I know you are about to finish your training as an Oncologist very soon. I hope you don’t change and stay the same, approachable and humane. Many physicians today lack compassion and treat patients like a number or a subject. Please don’t forget where you came from and use your gifts to heal the sick and save lives.

    May the Holy Spirit be with you.

    congratulations!! I wish you the best :)

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Thanks!!

      Reply
  6. Judy

    Hi All
    You spoke of writing a book and asked for input. I’ve been gluten free for over a year now. The paleo community requires the limiting of dairy also. I’m unsure about this aspect with respect to children and women. Are there not different times in our life cycle where we need more calcium for bone development or to stave off bone loss? I understand that exercise does a lot to strengthen bones (weight baring specifically). Is diet without the calcium we are supposed to consume and exercise enough? I know this is a big question as it relates to different age groups (and maybe different requirements?) but I’m still a little unsure about this issue.

    Thanks

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Great question, I am not so anti-dairy, but vitamin D and vitamn K from healthy fats are necessary for bone health and are definitely a big source in appropriate caveman/paleo diets. I do bet this changes throughout life though at different times.

      Thanks,
      CC

      Reply
    2. kem

      Not so sure you need dairy to make strong bones. None of my cattle have had a lick of milk since weaning, and every one of their bones are better than fine. It’s that vitamin K and D the good Dr speaks of. Calcium is in a lot of good food, the same green leafy vegetables that are chokker with K.

      That said, I love fermented milk products… yum.

      Reply
      1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

        Kem,

        Thanks for the great comments, and you are spot on with the vit K and D and leafy greens. And yes, I love some fermented dairy as well.

        Take care,
        CC

        1. jake3_14

          The calcium in plants is not as bioavailable as the calcium from animal sources. For example, your body will absorb only about 5% of the calcium in spinach.

          Reply
          1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

            Jake,

            There is data that shows that calcium in leafy greens is very absorbable. Some showing 60% absorbed.

            Take care,
            CC

            Reply
            1. jake3_14

              Perhaps in plants other than spinach, yes. But the oxalate content in spinach also binds with calcium, decreasing its absorption. Calcium in spinach is the least bioavailable of all plants (Heaney, Robert Proulx (2006). Calcium in human health. pp. 135. ISBN 978-1-59259-961-5.).

              Reply
              1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

                Jake, you are right. Other ones like Kale are much better.

                Thanks,
                CC

                Reply
  7. catherine

    Hi Dr Champ!

    I think you are dedicated and a very talented physician!
    If I’m not mistaken you speak around the country about cancer the Paleo diet. Can you please post on your site where you will be having speaking engagements so your readers will be inform.

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Thanks!

      I am talking next week on acoustic schwannomas, which I don’t think you want to hear, but will be speaking at PaleoFX 2013, in Austin:
      http://www.facebook.com/PaleoFX

      Thanks!!
      CC

      Reply
      1. catherince

        i dont think your talks are boring, i would go if it wasn’t so far from me!

        Reply
        1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

          Thanks!

          Reply
  8. Luis

    Well since you asked for input for the book, at the moment I have cooking methods on my mind, both for animals and plants. Whether to eat raw, steamed, cooked in an oven, slow cooker, pan, grilled, fermented, microwaved (never use it, but maybe ought to be covered). Cooking vessels might be good to cover as well.

    I generally go low and slow in the oven, but recently been curious about going raw.

    Keep up the good podcasting.

    Reply
    1. cavemandoctor (Post author)

      Good stuff. Thanks Luis!

      Reply

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>